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T-Rextasy: "I Wanna Be A Punk Rocker” to “Gap Yr Boiz"

By Katherine Mickewich | 11/10/17 2:54pm
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You are missing out if you haven’t heard of T-Rextasy. I remember the first time I listened to T-Rextasy: it was not at some house show or tiny venue pressed between other sweaty teens, or even a music recommendation from one of my friends. I was in the gym, working out to some random femme punk playlist on 8tracks when it cycled to “I Wanna Be A Punk Rocker." I rarely like songs on the first listen but this song stood out majorly. From the bizarrely endearing accent put on by the lead singer Lyris Faron, to the pop punk grooves and rebellious yet campy lyrics like “I gotta listen to the beating of my moshing heart,” I knew this band was special.

Upon listening to their first release, a self-titled EP, I fell in love with the other two songs I had heard, “Yellow Jacket Boy” and “Ms. Delores." Both songs having qualities I’d never heard before, “Yellow Jacket Boy” starting off with this strong reggae groove that devolves into a more traditionally punk melody, and back to reggae, it was one of the most genuinely fun songs I'd heard in ages. “Ms. Delores” didn’t disappoint to any degree either, I’d never heard a song about a lunch lady, let alone one so endearing and beautifully constructed. This is what I had instantly loved about T-rextasy, the careful way they construct and compose their own brand of rock. The songs have that raucous quality essential to punk, but don’t stray too far from thoughtfulness and delicateness.


After their first album Jurassic Punk debuted, they did a house show in my friend's’ garage in Connecticut, which I was too sick to go to, prompting a lot of angry pouting in my bed. Rightfully so, because Jurassic Punk was (in my opinion) one of the best albums of 2016. Not only does it pull together so many different genres, it melds it’s own T-Rextasy brand of punk into each song. In the song “Gap Yr Boiz” The quick-witted feminist band does not shy away from poking fun at guys who take a gap year, to come back and boast with pretentiousness. 

The song opens with, “We were layin’ on a hill and the sun was going down/Wayne was pointing out the itsy caterpillars on the ground/And he gently kissed me on the cheek and said he had to go/‘Cause there were eco-friendly fields of kale he needed to help grow.” This fun, rising femme rock group’s sophomore album is in the works according to their Audiotree live performance back in February 2017, and frankly I can’t wait to see what the band has in store.